About the Program

Live Well at Home helps older Minnesotans and veterans live well longer in their own homes. By working with local Area Agencies on Aging and community-based providers, Live Well at Home offers risk screening, education, professional consultation, and a broad range of solutions for living at home successfully. Live Well at Home also supports family caregivers so they get the help they need as they coordinate and provide care.

History of the Program

Live Well At Home was developed in 2007-2009 by the Minnesota Board on Aging with grant funding from the Administration on Aging. The grant project developed and tested a method to divert at-risk persons from spending down to Medical Assistance.  At-risk persons living in the community were identified and provided with risk management support so a permanent move to assisted living and/or nursing home facilities could be prevented or delayed.  The project also involved the expansion of self-directed services for persons living in the community.    

The Minnesota Board on Aging contracted with the University of Minnesota to develop and test a standardized tool - the quiz or Live Well at Home Rapid Screen® - that would identify at-risk older adults living in the community. Key partners in the project included: the Minnesota Department of Human Services, Arrowhead Area Agency on Aging, Central Minnesota Council on Aging, and Minnesota River Area Agency on Aging.  The university conducted a study which evaluated and validated the tool in 2009 and a performance evaluation of Live Well at Home in 2011. 

In 2009 the Minnesota Board on Aging was then awarded a 2-year Community Living Program grant from the Administration on Aging. This grant project supported further development, statewide implementation, and evaluation of Live Well at Home. Key partners in the project included: the Minnesota Department of Human Services, Arrowhead Area Aging on Aging, Central Minnesota Council on Aging, Minnesota River Area Agency on Aging, Land of the Dancing Sky Area Agency on Aging, Metropolitan Area Agency on Aging, Minnesota Indian Area Agency on Aging, and Southeastern Minnesota Area Agency on Aging. The project was evaluated by the University of Minnesota as described in the article The Minnesota Live Well at Home Project: Screening and Client Satisfaction  Gaugler, J. E., Vujovich, J., Yahnke, P., & Boldsichar, M. The Minnesota Live Well at Home Project: Pilot implementation and evaluation (2011). Home Health Care Services Quarterly, 30, 63-83.*,**

The project was supported by grants, numbers 90AM3167 and 90CD1198, from the Administration on Aging, Department of Health and Human Services, Washington, D.C., 20201 and, the Minnesota Board on Aging, St. Paul, MN 55164. Grantees undertaking projects under government sponsorship are encouraged to express freely their findings and conclusions. Points of view or opinions do not, therefore, necessarily represent official Administration on Aging or Minnesota Board on Aging policy.